Monday, May 21, 2012

Fun Garden Beds

I have a tremendous amount of amusement creating fun and new decorative garden beds in our garden.  Today, I wanted to share a simple "How-To" of building a very cool flower/garden bed.

We obtained a great supply of old, heavy fencing that is weathered and worn.  This lumber made the perfect material for one of my favorite garden beds.  I started by cutting the fence posts into varying sizes from 6" to 14" in length.


I then started digging a design in the yard in the shape I wanted my garden bed.  



Once the garden border has been completed, it is time to lay a layer of newspapers... not too thick.  You want enough that it helps with weed control but not too much so that it decomposes and allows the plant roots to grow below.  I put about three to four sheets thick.  I have read on other blog sites and internet sites that some people put the newspaper as thick as 8 sheets thick.








It's important to water the newspaper thouroughly... making sure the newspaper is good and wet!














It's then time to put down the gardening soil.  We usually put in our own home grown compost, but had run out.  We bought some good Vegetable/garden soil at Lowe's.  Be sure to put a thick amount of soil to allow for root growth.  We put 6-8 inches.









The garden bed is now ready for planting.  We planted cauliflower, cilantro, spinach, and broccoli in this garden bed













Copyright © 2012 Life's Casual Observer blog, Lauren Espinoza

13 comments:

  1. This turned out really nice. I like the newspaper in the bottom idea.

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  2. did this last year to my whole front yard, used up to 10 sheets of news paper then when i ran out i used cardboard then covered it with the soil then a layer of mulch. worked really well, i now have a huge flower garden!

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    1. That's awesome, Nicky. I'm so glad you've had such fun with your flower garden. I would love to see photos.

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  3. I had to go to the website to learn what your pin was about. All I saw was a funky raised bed with newspaper in it. Since it was next to a dry creek bed but didn't match the bed, I couldn't figure out what you meant. "I put cardboard in the bottom" doesn't help(that must have been written by a pinner). Once at the website, it made sense.

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    1. Linda, I'm glad it finally made sense. The us of cardboard must have been what another person tried in their flower bed. The reason I use newspaper is so the roots of plants can grow further down (through the newspaper). The newspaper definitely helps keep the weeds under control.

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    2. Linda, I'm glad it finally made sense. The us of cardboard must have been what another person tried in their flower bed. The reason I use newspaper is so the roots of plants can grow further down (through the newspaper). The newspaper definitely helps keep the weeds under control.

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  4. How'd it look with plants? Final pic missing!

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    1. Great question. We moved from that location before the plants had time to really grow. I think I have a photo somewhere of the young plants. I will try and find it and add it to the blog post.

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    2. Great question. We moved from that location before the plants had time to really grow. I think I have a photo somewhere of the young plants. I will try and find it and add it to the blog post.

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  5. your project gave me inspiration for a path from our home to the garden- hubby wants it not "straight" and with pavers and using your idea for the design will be fun! thanks

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  6. With the inks and chemicals in the paper is it a good idea to usd the need paper? The ink is my bigest concern as it won't break down. It is not a biodegradable ink.

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  7. That was my concern as well. For flowers ok, but I don't think I would eat veggies grown near newspaper inks. Not sure how much of the chemicals get absorbed into the food. Are there any studies regarding uptake into the plants?

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  8. http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2001-11-11/news/0111110385_1_flint-ink-color-ink-soybean-oil

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